Chasing volume

 Cornelia modeled for me earlier this month, and this is one of my favorites from the shoot. I am still figuring out where to shoot in the house, I guess it is good to have options. Cornelia is a great model, anticipating what I want and reminding me that I can control the camera when I get too involved in a shot and forget...  It was great to catch up and talk pictures with  Cornelia --she makes a great model because she is such an exacting photographer herself!  This shot evolved out of a kind of chroma-key image I had sketched--three disks of primary color in transition. This photo is a double exposure, here the hand was only in frame for one of the two shots. 

Cornelia modeled for me earlier this month, and this is one of my favorites from the shoot. I am still figuring out where to shoot in the house, I guess it is good to have options. Cornelia is a great model, anticipating what I want and reminding me that I can control the camera when I get too involved in a shot and forget...

It was great to catch up and talk pictures with Cornelia--she makes a great model because she is such an exacting photographer herself!

This shot evolved out of a kind of chroma-key image I had sketched--three disks of primary color in transition. This photo is a double exposure, here the hand was only in frame for one of the two shots. 

"Camouflaging" and Pinterest mood boards

Pinterest has turned out to be a surprisingly useful tool for me as an art director. I've been using it to corral and share my visual ideas in advance of making a more formal art proposal. Currently I am working on feature about so-called "camouflaging" by women with autism.

The illustrator picked for this story is Alessandra Genualdo, someone I have not worked with before, but her images came up again and again in my ideas stage, and in the end my Pinterest folder was full of them. The germinating image for this collection is the image in the lower left below. 

Screenshot 2018-02-08 16.23.22.png

This is a fascinating problem from a visual standpoint--women with autism often feel they are 'faking it', or that they are trying hard to blend in socially, or even that they are disappearing, or losing themselves. There's a lot of mental strain, and distorted self-image. Its a scary feeling to imagine, and a terrible thing to live with, but it is a rich concept to tackle in art.

The collection is around different iterations of the idea of 'camouflaging', including an actual kind of camouflage, wallpaper, or pattern that would surround a female figure and hide her somehow in her surroundings, or emphasize potentially awkward gestures, or stimming. The logic of the collection is not based around a particular style, but rather variations in ways the concept could be expressed. See it here: https://www.pinterest.com/skyone1/camouflaging/